Homegrown sweet corn is one of our specialties and just one example of how we celebrate the flavors of the Northeast. We team up with a variety of Northeast farms to choose seed varieties that produce the most tender, flavorful corn you’ll find anywhere. Here are some great ways to make the most of one of our region’s best agricultural products!

  1. Make Fritters

In addition to eating corn right off the cob, try spicing it up with a recipe from our friends at Reeves Farm in Baldwinsville, NY –  Reeves Family Corn Fritters  

  1. Spice it Up

Try this Spicy Maple Mayo from our friends at Butternut Mountain Farm in Morristown, VT. Simply mix 1 cup mayonnaise, ¼ cup pre maple syrup, ½ juice from a fresh lime, and 1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder together for a tangy twist. Spicy Maple Mayo is one of our favorite additions to corn on the cob. Check out Butternut Mountain Farm’s website for more info – Spicy Maple Mayo.

  1. Eat it Fresh off the Cob

Sweet corn is even sweeter when eaten fresh off the cob. Many of our local farmer friends, like the Eckhardt Family in Stephentown, NY, enjoy sweet corn raw as much as they enjoy it cooked. It’s a simple yet very tasty option to try this season!

   4. Make Mexican Street Corn Salad

Looking for a fun twist on your corn this summer? Add this recipe for Grilled Mexican Corn Street Salad – Grilled Mexican Street Corn Salad  to your repertoire. A refreshing combination of flavors sure to satisfy your summer palate!

     5. Kick it up with Parmesan Spread

Fire up the grill for this one! This recipe for Grilled Corn with Parmesan Spread & Basil – Grilled Corn with Parmesan Spread & Basil makes a perfect side dish for any summertime barbeque.  Be prepared as your guests will be calling for more!

Here in the Northeast sweet corn is a summertime staple. Nothing says summer like that first bite into fresh, crisp corn on the cob. The classics are great, but we love to mix it up, and these are five great ways to do just that. Maybe you’ll even discover a new favorite! Whichever way you choose to enjoy your local corn this growing season, make sure to stop by your local Price Chopper or Market 32 for all of your summertime goods!

Written by our friends at Cabot Creamery   Cabot Creamery Co-operative, owned by 1,100 dairy farm families throughout New England and upstate New York, invite you to visit a farm on Sunday, October 9th!   As a co-operative, our farm families own the business and all profits are returned to the farmers, which means that when you purchase Cabot products you are directly supporting farmers in your local communities.   That spirit of supporting your community is what cabot-oct-event-2we love about Price Chopper’s Homegrown Flavors program. Cabot is proud to be a part of this program that connects people to local food producers, and for that reason our farm family owners are opening their gates to show appreciation for their neighbor’s support. Every participating farm features different activities, such as farm tours, hayrides, scavenger hunts and games for families. It is a chance to meet neighbors, farm critters and the farmers responsible for the “World’s Best Cheddar”.   Open Farm Sunday events on Sunday, October 9th will run from 11am – 2pm. Visit our Open Farm Sunday event page for more details and find a participating farm near you! cabot-oct-event   Written by: Ellie Wilson, MS, RDN Black Horse Farm Coxsackie, NY Farmers – Lloyd Zimmerman and Family LloydZBlackhorseLloyd Zimmerman did not grow up farming – he was a NYC kid, child of two college professors, but he became interested in agriculture because his family had a summer home in the country. At 21, he graduated with a degree in agricultural economics, and purchased an old farm in Coeyman’s Hollow with the help of his parents. He farmed part-time, while working for New York State, eventually working in the Governor’s office on agriculture and civil defense. In 1964, the farm started making money and he “retired” from state service. He and his wife raised lamb, initially, and one of his first customers was Central Markets. After Vietnam, market pressures moved him into vegetables, and he hasn’t looked back. His favorite part of farming is watching crops grow, and working with the broad group of people in the produce business. While he did not grow up farming, his children did, and two daughters, Chellie Apa and Lisa Buhrmaster, now run major aspects of the operation. They employ on average about 55 people – this is a diverse and dynamic business. At this time of year, his day starts at 4:30 AM, but has started as early as 2:30, which some of their team starts still because they are packing trucks. That work is essential to bringing in those fresh items – time between field and fork is important. Lloyd chooses his seeds based on science and savvy – sweet corn and tomatoes should have a good, sweet taste, so they start there, and then look at some of the scientific specifications of a product, like the measurement of sweetness, called degrees Brix. They work with the seed salesman to locate varieties of new items that have a good reputation and production. There are very strict standards and procedures in place around harvest and packing – cleanliness is king, and Black Horse Farm is GAP certified. GAP stands for Good BlackhorsecabbageAgricultural Practices, and it is a system of practices and record keeping that helps farmers ensure food safety is being managed. Price Chopper only works with farms that are GAP certified, as part of our commitment to ensuring our customers can be confident that they really are getting the best quality fruits and vegetables from us. Attention to refrigeration, hand washing and other aspects of safe food production are part and parcel of their work. They also sort their produce with those less fortunate in mind, and work with local food pantries to supply good food that is not premium grade. There are some game changers on the horizon – Lloyd sees two that he thinks will impact farming in enormous ways. The first is the use of drones – he has been wishing for these for over 20 years, and is excited that they are coming to farming. The other is the advanced education farmers are starting to benefit from, as children return to their family farms with degrees in agronomy, veterinary science and business. I really enjoyed speaking with Lloyd – his gravelly voice ebbed and flowed as we spoke, full of passion and humor and knowledge. With helping people eat more fruits and vegetables so central to my role, I asked what he thought would help people do a better job, and he thought helping people understand what local produce is and who the farmers are is a great start. We completely bonded over favorites – tomatoes, on a delicious BLT sandwich with a malted milk (I make mine with the Price Chopper pre-cooked bacon – slices are nice and thin, great for sandwiches).  So, please take my advice – take advantage of the season and enjoy the bounty Price Chopper brings you from farmers like Lloyd Zimmerman – sweet summer! Check out this recipe for Lemon & Garlic Glazed Corn on the Cob!