home.grown. Farm Feature: Reeves Farms

Jack Gelok

Marketing Intern

A Berry Sweet Legacy: The Story of Reeves Farms

It all started with a young 18-year-old coming from Draycott, England to Jacksonville, New York. His name was Arthur Thomas Reeves the founder of Reeves Farm. Arthur started out working on his aunt and uncle’s farm, but by 1898, he and his wife Mary had saved enough to buy their own patch of paradise on what is now known as Reeves Road. With eight kids running around, the Reeves family was starting a farming legacy.

The Fast-Paced World of Farming

In the mid-1920s, Arthur’s son Edward, along with his wife Flossie, took the reins and moved the farm a bit further down Reeves Road. They focused on crops and milking cows. Their son Cecil, after a stint in the Navy during WWII, decided he’d had enough of cows and set his sights on crop farming. Cecil and his wife Dorothy juggled raising nine kids and growing vegetables and grain, proving that farming really is a family affair.

60’s Expansion

By the 1960s, the farm was expanding faster than you can say “strawberry shortcake.” Cecil and Dorothy bought more land, growing fresh market vegetables and berries. Their hard work laid the groundwork for the farm’s next big leap.

The Reeves Farm Today

In 1990, Cecil and Dorothy handed the keys over to their sons Bruce, Mark, and Brian. After Bruce left the partnership in 1992, their brother Andy joined the team. Today, two of Mark’s children, Nolan and Karin, are also part of the farm’s management, making Reeves Farms a true multi-generational operation.

The Reeves Family Looking into the Future

What makes Reeves Farms extra special is their commitment to sustainability. They use Integrated Pest Management, reduced tillage, cover crops, crop rotation, and organic production to keep the soil and water healthy. It’s all about farming smart to ensure this land can keep producing mouthwatering berries and veggies for generations to come.

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Ellie Wilson

MS, RDN, CDN

Eye health is an often-overlooked issue (no pun intended) until something happens to impact or change vision. Loss of vision is a substantial health challenge with significant impacts on quality of life, and the most common diseases have a long, slow development timeline, leaving many not realizing they are headed for vision issues. Nutrition has been a target for research and consumer interest in this field. Research shows some important nutrient roles in maximizing vision functions, but connecting specific nutrients to specific roles in prevention and management of vision issues has been more challenging than expected.

The good news is that we can connect recommendations for eating more produce, managing blood pressure and blood sugar, and enjoying foods that are part of a Mediterranean style of eating to reduced likelihood of chronic vision challenges such as cataracts, macular degeneration, or glaucoma. There is a significant linkage between ensuring heart and artery health is maintained, because all nutrients that have a relationship with protecting vision also need to reach those tissues via a strong cardiovascular system.

Orange flags produce that offers significant amounts of Vitamin A, essential to ensuring eyes can see light and color – carrots, sweet potatoes, cantaloupe, and apricots are on the menu for this critical nutrient. Vitamin A also protects against dry eye and has a role in the quality of tears. Antioxidant Vitamin C, found in red peppers, oranges, strawberries, and more, has been correlated with prevention or delay of macular degeneration.

Vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids also have roles in eye health, along with bioactive compounds lutein and zeaxanthin. Lutein and zeaxanthin are found in leafy greens, tomatoes and eggs, and are critical to the health of the macula, which is the center of vision function in the eyes. Most of these vitamins and compounds are fat-soluble, meaning they need some healthy fats in food to be absorbed well, which opens the door for delicious foods like avocado, nuts, seafood and olive oil – hopefully, they were all on your grocery list already!

Supplements also have some supportive data and are most beneficial for those with macular degeneration or at risk for it.  The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 found supplements with specific amounts of the vitamins highlighted have positive benefits when used in conjunction with recommendations from your health care provider. Learn more about that here Vitamins for AMD – American Academy of Ophthalmology (aao.org).

Bottom line – plant-forward, nutrient-rich foods are important to eye and overall health throughout your life. Enjoy them as part of your vision of a healthy future!

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Mia Teal

Marketing Coordinator, Paid Media

Happy pumpkin season! Now is the perfect time to have a friendly pumpkin carving competition with friends and family or decorating the house with mini pumpkins and gourds. At Price Chopper and Market 32, we are proud to source all our pumpkins from local farms in our region each season. We get our pumpkins from many of the same farms who supply us with favorites like sweet corn and tomatoes in the summertime. Additionally, we also source our hard squashes, gourds, and ornamentals from local farms here in the Northeast during the fall. Find out below which farmers we are highlighting this pumpkin picking season!  

Reeves Farms, Baldwinsville NY

Reeves Farms has been a partner for over 30 years, growing everything from organic zucchini to pie pumpkins. By using sustainable farming methods, Reeves Farms is proud to offer fresh berries and vegetables as well. Be sure to grab some fresh produce after heading to the pumpkin patch!

AJ Farms, Melrose NY

The Wertman Family Farm began in Colonie, NY four generations ago. As the business started to prosper, the family decided to move to Melrose, NY where much more farmland is present. Not only do they have fresh produce and stunning flowers, but they are also experts in growing pumpkins and hard squashes.

Hoover’s Produce, Port Trevorton PA

We are proud to have been a partner with Hoover’s Produce for over 25 years! They have an array of pumpkins for carving and decoration that are perfect for this pumpkin season.

Plainville Farm, Hadley MA

A third-generation farm in Hadley, Massachusetts, Plainville Farm specializes in pumpkins, asparagus, hard squash, and their famous butternut squash. We are proud to be partners for the past seven years!  

Interested in learning more about these four partners? Visit their websites below!

Reeves Farms

AJ Farms

Hoover’s Produce

Plainville Farm

Next time you buy a pumpkin from your local Price Chopper and Market 32, you know that it was grown locally. Oh, and don’t forget to grab a pumpkin carving kit while you are here!

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Mia Teal

Marketing Coordinator, Paid Media

The month of July has so much to offer. The weather is beautiful, school is out, and everywhere we look there are barbecues and picnics. It only makes sense that National Grilling Month is celebrated for the entirety of this month! When we think of firing up the grill, hot dogs and hamburgers are most likely the first thing to come to mind. However, there are actually an array of items that can be grilled. Some may even surprise you. Let’s take a look below!

Watermelon: Grilling watermelon is actually quite simple. If you are new to the whole “grilling fruit” idea, then you are in for a treat. Picture the juicy sweetness of watermelon with a smoky flavor. It is quite the combination. The watermelon should be cut into wedges and placed on a heated grill for two to three minutes. Some people may add sugar or spices, or just eat it plain.

Pineapple: Grilled pineapple is a must-try this summer. They can be cut in rings, wedges, or cubes. Many people brush the pineapple in butter and/or brown sugar, but that is optional. Lightly oil the grate and cook pineapple for two to three minutes. 

Bananas: If you are a banana-lover, then you are in for a serious treat! To grill bananas, slice them down the middle with the peel intact. Place the cut-side of the banana on the grill and wait to see grill marks (should only be about two minutes). An option here is to sprinkle on sugar or honey. Using tongs, flip the bananas over for five more minutes, or until the peel starts to pull away. This is best served with vanilla ice cream. Speaking of, Price Chopper and Market 32 have a new line of PICS Pint Ice Cream! Check them out here

Tofu: Looking to change up the way you eat tofu? Look no further! Grilled, seasoned tofu is a delicious summertime meal. You will want to buy firm or extra firm tofu, not soft. Press the excess liquid from the tofu prior to placing it on the grill, and make sure you oil the grill so the tofu does not stick. Cut tofu, paint with your marinade of choice, and then throw on the grill for two to three minutes each side. There you have it – Quick, easy, and anything but boring! 

Pizza: If you have never grilled pizza before, then stop what you are doing and read this! Place the plain, formed dough on a cookie sheet and gently slide it onto the heated grill. The key here is to grill the dough on both sides, and then remove from the grill. Once you notice it starts to brown on one side, use tongs to flip. Once both sides are browned, let the crust cool on a rack for a few minutes to two hours. When you are ready, add your toppings and place back on the grill for two to three minutes.

Be sure to browse all-things grilling below for more traditional barbecue food!  

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Ellie Wilson

MS, RDN Manager, Lifestyles and Wellness

January rings in the New Year and inspires us to evaluate targets and goals that will bring positive results to our lives. There is one change that would bring more wellbeing benefit to more people than almost any other – eating more fruits and vegetables! Only one in ten Americans eats enough to meet daily guidelines for health. We also see shoppers are seeking more organic items for many reasons, particularly because they know that since 2002, organic items meet strict USDA certification standards.

The USDA certification offers production insights and confidence to shoppers.  As quoted in Food Insight’s “What is Organic” article, USDA notes that “organic products must be produced using agricultural production practices that foster resource cycling, promote ecological balance, maintain and improve soil and water quality, minimize the use of synthetic materials, and conserve biodiversity.” This is right in line with shopper aspirations to eat more mindfully, consider production impact and sustainability along with taste and health value.

You can always find high quality produce, proteins, and grocery items in our stores, including a huge selection of organic items. To help you enjoy more, now through January 28th, earn 3X AdvantEdge Rewards points on organic purchases that can help families bring more benefits to your table.

Organic product tags on our website can help you select organic items for pickup or delivery and explore products across our site that fuel your wellness routine. Check out our weekly flyer each week this month and look for our special organic shelf tags to find out which simple, seasonal organic items are ready for you to enjoy! 

Happy New Year!

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Price Chopper and Market 32 are Produce Proud, and kicking off July with beautiful options, and  AdvantEdge points for produce purchases. https://www.pricechopper.com/rewards/  Make half of your plate fruits and veggies at snacks and meals, and you will reap the benefits of eating well. Check out some of these easy and exciting ways to fire up your produce intake and power up delicious, nutritious meals!

Great grilling!

Check out the seasonal section of our stores for grill pans, metal and wooden skewers you can use to short cut grilling vegetables and fruit! If using wooden skewers, soak in water for at least 30 minutes to prevent burning. Choose your favorite cut fruit, like fresh mango or pineapple, oil the grill pan or the grill itself with some olive oil, then get going with some fun serving ideas. Thin vegetables like green beans, asparagus or scallions cook up in 4 minutes or less. Thicker cuts of vegetables may take a few more minutes to reach that warm but still crunchy-tender texture that goes so well with everything. Fruits should be watched carefully so the natural sugars don’t burn – marinate in a balsamic vinaigrette or add in something spicy for a wonderful topping, side or salsa!

Serving Savvy

Sassy Salsa – Grill sliced mango or fresh pineapple spears, (available already cut in the Produce fresh cut case), until warm and slightly softened. Dust with cayenne, top with sliced scallions and serve with grilled chicken or seafood.

Brussels Kabobs – Carefully rinse and trim the ends off of bagged, fresh Brussels sprouts, keeping the ends intact. If feeding a crowd, rinse a net bag of Market 32 Baby Red or Yellow Potatoes, too. Microwave the sprouts and potatoes for 4-5 minutes, until slightly soft. Allow vegetables to cool slightly, then thread with sweet onion quarters onto kabobs and cook on an oiled grill on medium heat until slightly charred and tender, 8-10 minutes, turning to brown evenly. Toss with lemon vinaigrette and serve with your favorite protein, like grilled flank steak.

Caesar Asparagus – Wash and trim fresh asparagus. Oil grill and cook on medium until tender, approximately 4-6 minutes, turning frequently. Top with a squeeze of fresh lemon and some shredded Parmesan cheese. Enjoy hot or cold!

Grilling greats know this food safety tip – wash all fresh produce, even if it will be peeled or cut up, before prepping.

Ellie Wilson, MS, RDN, Senior Nutritionist The American Heart Association, long known for their efforts to educate Americans about the best ways to enjoy great heart health, began a new tradition several years ago with National Eating Healthy Day. It always falls on the first Wednesday of November, and seeks to help people keep their heart in mind as the holidays begin. The theme this year is “Be Colorful”, to get us thinking about and enjoying more fruits and vegetables at all of our eating occasions. You can add more produce to your diet with these easy, quick tips: eggplant White bean dip with vegetables
  1. Power up breakfast with some dried fruit in oatmeal, like dried cherries and apricots.
  2. Make that morning snack a small apple and a light cheese stick – produce plus protein is perfect!
  3. Add some extra frozen or canned veggies to your lunchtime soup, or mix bagged, chopped salads with romaine lettuce for a quick power salad. Dress with balsamic vinegar and a drizzle of olive oil to keep the taste high and calories low.
  4. Hummus and cut veggies make a flavorful, plant-protein and fiber-rich afternoon snack.
  5. Double up on dinner vegetables – double servings of the same item, or mix and match fresh/ready-to-eat vegetables with your favorite cooked ones – with produce, more is always better!
Get your holiday season started with National Eating Healthy Day and give your heart a great gift! https://www.pricechopper.com/recipes/11374/Caramelized-Brussels-Sprouts-with-Lemon https://www.pricechopper.com/recipes/7283/Apple-Date-Squares http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HeathyEating/Nutrition/National-Eating-Healthy-Day_UCM_454414_Article.jsp#.WA-K9fkrKM8       Written by Sara Lilkas, Marketing Intern  When people ask about my favorite foods my first instinct is to choose apples. But when I say apples I do not only mean the delicious fruit, I’m also including the multitude of apple flavored baked goods, ciders, and the association they have with fall. Growing up in Upstate New York aka Apple Country, I would probably be considered a social pariah if apples were not high on my list of favorite foods. I couldn’t even tell you why I like apples so much since each variety has its own distinct flavor. If I had to pick my favorite varieties they would have to be golden delicious, granny smith, and honeycrisp (so you can see my taste go from very sweet to very tart.) The real reason that I have apples on my mind is the weather is beginning to cool down so in addition to pulling out the scarves and boots, apples will begin to pop up everywhere again (which is fantastic.) What’s even more fantastic is the amount of apples available from local growers. Even though New York State may be known for apples, I have recently learned they are actually grown throughout the Northeastern United States. There are tons of orchards throughout the Northeast and many of them are still family owned and run. Price Chopper works hard to find the best tasting apples from local growers located in various parts of New York, Connecticut, and Vermont (and that’s only including a few of the growers they purchase from.) In this search for the best apples Price Chopper has developed long term relationships with many growers including Sunrise Orchards in Vermont (20 years!) apples treesSunrise Orchards and Roger’s Orchards in Connecticut take great pride in how their apples are grown. Both orchards are certified as Eco Apples™ and have to adhere to strict growing practices in order to receive this certification. The program focuses on the quality of the soil the apples are grown on, and keeping beneficial insects within the environment. As part of this process having as much information about what is going on in the orchard and the plants surrounding the area is essential. By monitoring insect populations, growing conditions, and other factors that are important to the growing process growers can determine whether it is necessary to treat against any unwanted fungus or pest that may be harmful to the apple crop. The Eco Apple™ certification is not given out to every orchard, every year. In order to receive the certification the orchards have to undergo a review by the IPM Institute of North America, to ensure that the growing conditions have been upheld for the year. As I mentioned earlier I really love ciders. Every once in a while I may indulge in a hard cider (my favorite is Woodchuck!), but the typical nonalcoholic fare is my true favorite. There is nothing better than a beautiful fall day with a glass of apple cider. I’ve recently been experimenting with warming apple cider for those days when the first fingers of winter reach into the air. I’ve found warming up apple cider and adding a pinch of cinnamon does the trick! When it comes to apple baking I love the classics. There is nothing better in my mind then a warm slice of apple pie (or a whole apple pie whatever floats your boat). My best friend has recently been trying to teach me how to bake and we decided to start big with the pie. We used this recipe for an apple pie from scratch, but a pre-made or gluten free crust could easily be substituted! How do you enjoy apples in the fall? Share your apple creations on Instagram with #PriceChopper and #Market32! Cold redcurrant tea with lemon and mint in a glass jar. Written by Sara Rockman, Marketing Intern  One way to stay cool and hydrated in the summer heat? Infused water. Infused water is a great way to drink the recommend eight 8 oz. glasses a day, but without it being boring. Infused water is simply water flavored by fresh fruit, with the occasional herb or two thrown in. The fruit can either be put directly into the water or there are special bottles and pitchers made specifically for infusing. (These are nice because they help so you don’t accidentally drink a seed or unexpected chunk of fruit.) I usually like to make my infused water the night before so more flavor is absorbed (I also recommend this if you are a chronic user of the snooze button like myself, so you don’t have to rush in the morning), but for a more subtle taste it can be made the day you plan to drink it. If making it the day of, let the water sit for about 10 minutes either with ice or in the fridge before you drink it so the flavors have a chance to be absorbed. This step should also be taken if you are refilling your water bottle throughout the day. Towards the end of the day, there won’t be a very strong flavor, but the subtle flavor is still very refreshing! As for what to put into your infused water, it’s pretty much open to what you like. I go from lemon and lime one day, to strawberry-kiwi, to mixed berry, whatever suits my mood (or more truthfully, whatever is in my fridge). One of my favorite infused water recipe is a strawberry-cucumber water, with basil. (I know it sounds like a really weird mix, but it’s very refreshing)! When choosing ingredients for your infused water pick fruits loaded with vitamins and antioxidants to help boost your metabolism and immune system. Plus, drinking lots of water whether infused or not is good for your skin and promotes weight loss!  As an all-natural option, it keeps you both hydrated and healthy by cutting out unnecessary sugars and additives. Pinterest is a great place to find inspiration for different recipes. Submit your favorite infused water recipe in the comments and it could be featured on our Instagram and Pinterest! Written by: Ellie Wilson, MS, RDN Black Horse Farm Coxsackie, NY Farmers – Lloyd Zimmerman and Family LloydZBlackhorseLloyd Zimmerman did not grow up farming – he was a NYC kid, child of two college professors, but he became interested in agriculture because his family had a summer home in the country. At 21, he graduated with a degree in agricultural economics, and purchased an old farm in Coeyman’s Hollow with the help of his parents. He farmed part-time, while working for New York State, eventually working in the Governor’s office on agriculture and civil defense. In 1964, the farm started making money and he “retired” from state service. He and his wife raised lamb, initially, and one of his first customers was Central Markets. After Vietnam, market pressures moved him into vegetables, and he hasn’t looked back. His favorite part of farming is watching crops grow, and working with the broad group of people in the produce business. While he did not grow up farming, his children did, and two daughters, Chellie Apa and Lisa Buhrmaster, now run major aspects of the operation. They employ on average about 55 people – this is a diverse and dynamic business. At this time of year, his day starts at 4:30 AM, but has started as early as 2:30, which some of their team starts still because they are packing trucks. That work is essential to bringing in those fresh items – time between field and fork is important. Lloyd chooses his seeds based on science and savvy – sweet corn and tomatoes should have a good, sweet taste, so they start there, and then look at some of the scientific specifications of a product, like the measurement of sweetness, called degrees Brix. They work with the seed salesman to locate varieties of new items that have a good reputation and production. There are very strict standards and procedures in place around harvest and packing – cleanliness is king, and Black Horse Farm is GAP certified. GAP stands for Good BlackhorsecabbageAgricultural Practices, and it is a system of practices and record keeping that helps farmers ensure food safety is being managed. Price Chopper only works with farms that are GAP certified, as part of our commitment to ensuring our customers can be confident that they really are getting the best quality fruits and vegetables from us. Attention to refrigeration, hand washing and other aspects of safe food production are part and parcel of their work. They also sort their produce with those less fortunate in mind, and work with local food pantries to supply good food that is not premium grade. There are some game changers on the horizon – Lloyd sees two that he thinks will impact farming in enormous ways. The first is the use of drones – he has been wishing for these for over 20 years, and is excited that they are coming to farming. The other is the advanced education farmers are starting to benefit from, as children return to their family farms with degrees in agronomy, veterinary science and business. I really enjoyed speaking with Lloyd – his gravelly voice ebbed and flowed as we spoke, full of passion and humor and knowledge. With helping people eat more fruits and vegetables so central to my role, I asked what he thought would help people do a better job, and he thought helping people understand what local produce is and who the farmers are is a great start. We completely bonded over favorites – tomatoes, on a delicious BLT sandwich with a malted milk (I make mine with the Price Chopper pre-cooked bacon – slices are nice and thin, great for sandwiches).  So, please take my advice – take advantage of the season and enjoy the bounty Price Chopper brings you from farmers like Lloyd Zimmerman – sweet summer! Check out this recipe for Lemon & Garlic Glazed Corn on the Cob!