The Many Ways of Maple Syrup

Maple syrup is best known for its role as a sweet finishing touch to pancakes and waffles. However, its abilities go far beyond the breakfast table. Maple farmers use special drills to tap into the trees to obtain the sap that’s boiled down to produce the pure maple syrup we know and love. Here in the Northeast, maple sugaring season occurs as winter ends and spring begins. We’re proud to partner with a variety of local maple farmers and producers in our region to bring you the season’s best. You can add pure maple syrup from our local partners to your culinary tool belt and use them in breakfast recipes, desserts and beyond!

Swap Syrup for Sugar

Give your favorite treats complex, caramelly tastes by using maple syrup in place of sugar in baked goods such as cookies, cakes, breads and muffins. Replace 1 cup of granulated sugar with ¾ cup of maple syrup. For every cup of liquid sweetener, reduce added liquids in the recipe by about 3 to 4 tablespoons. Add about 1 tablespoon of flour for every ¼ cup of maple syrup if there’s no liquid called for in the recipe. When swapping these ingredients, ensure your syrup is at room temperature, as cold syrup can cause other ingredients to clump.

Savory Syrup

Maple syrup adds complexity and subtle sweetness to numerous savory dishes. Use it to flavor proteins like chicken, pork, or salmon, or pair it with bacon for a mouthwatering, sweet and smoky treat. Try whisking it into salad dressings to give your greens hints of caramelization or bring out the natural sweetness of veggies by drizzling maple syrup over tomatoes, squash, potatoes and mushrooms.

Drinks & Desserts

Maple syrup’s versatility extends from the plate to the glass! Add a dash to your morning coffee or tea, or use it to spice up a classic old fashioned or whiskey sour cocktail. It also makes a drool-worthy addition to these Maple Caramel Bacon Brownies, used as a sweetener for whipped cream or drizzled over scones, ice cream, pies and more.

Looking for more ways to use maple syrup in your everyday cooking? Click here! From all of us at Price Chopper & Market 32, happy maple sugaring season!

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It’s maple sugaring season in the Northeast, and we’re all amped up for local maple.

Today’s lesson: Maple Syrup Beyond the Stack of Pancakes!

Each winter as the weather starts to warm up, maple trees in our region produce sweet sap that contains a small amount of sugar and a large amount of water. By boiling off the water from sap, a 100% pure sugar substance is created: maple syrup. The almighty nectar of the maple tree!

We live in one of the only regions in the world with the ideal climate for maple agriculture, and we’re proud to partner with a wide variety of local maple farmers and producers here in the Northeast, who are currently hard at work in the midst of this year’s maple sugaring season.

A lot of folks love pouring maple syrup on their pancakes and waffles, which is certainly delicious, but maple has so much more to offer. Maple syrup is a versatile ingredient and can be used in baked goods, savory dinner entrées and more!

Bring maple syrup to life beyond your pancakes by…

Stirring it into your morning (or afternoon, or evening) coffee: Maple syrup is a 100% pure and natural sweetener: it’ll add a delicious flavor to your cup of coffee.

Pouring it over ice cream: Take a bowl of your favorite ice cream (we like vanilla the best) and drizzle some maple syrup over it, with a blanket of whipped cream: this is what dreams are made of. Our New Hampshire pals at Ben’s Sugar Shack are big fans of this treat.

Making maple garlic salmon: Mix maple syrup with minced garlic and a pinch of salt and glaze salmon with it. It’s a game changer.

Making maple mustard: Chances are you’ve had honey mustard more than once in your life. Maple mustard is a similar (but incredible) spin on the classic yellow condiment. Just whisk a bit of maple syrup into some Dijon mustard and you’ve got yourself a new favorite salad dressing, sandwich spread and more. Sweet.

Making salted maple pie: This one takes a little effort, but the results will have you shedding tears of joy. Vermont’s famous Butternut Mountain Farm offers this awesome recipe that’ll satisfy your sweet tooth and your savory tooth.

There you have it: maple syrup doesn’t have to live exclusively in breakfast land. Looking for more maple-spiration? Check out our home.grown. maple Pinterest board for a collection of recipes from our local maple partners!

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